Improving teacher professionalism is good for teachers, good for the schools where they teach, and good for the students at those schools, according to the recent report Supporting Teacher Professionalism: Insights from TALIS 2013 from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

The report, based on data from the 2013 Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS), looks at how countries around the world focus on professional development activities to prepare and support teachers. It divides those activities into three domains of teacher professionalism: the knowledge of teachers; their autonomy for making decisions; and their networks, such as the in-school mentoring a new teacher might receive. The report shows a clear and positive relationship between the treatment of teachers as professionals, teachers’ perceptions of their own professional status, and their satisfaction with their jobs and school environments.

Important is the report’s alignment with key focus areas of the Alliance: high schools and equity. As the report states, secondary school teachers may benefit more from investments in teacher professionalism than elementary school teachers. In addition, the report finds that the positive relationship between teacher professionalism and job satisfaction is even more pronounced in schools serving historically underserved students:

The results here indicate that teacher professionalism practices are almost always positively associated with increased teacher satisfaction, especially when the support comes in the form of increased professional knowledge or increased peer networks. Important for equity concerns, this positive association is largely amplified in high-needs schools, suggesting that one of the best investments schools can make in increasing teacher satisfaction is providing practices that support teacher professionalism.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: all4ed.org

See on Scoop.itAssessment | Learning and Teaching | Coaching

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